Jody Cranston : 5 DIET MISCONCEPTIONS.

Diet, nutrition and weight loss are probably the most often written and talked about subjects in the entire fitness industry. There seems to a new "plan" and "ground breaking" information all the time. But beware; topics that have so much information are bound to have a number of misconceptions based on half-truths with no scientific study to back them up.

Press Release (PressBurner) Jul 27, 2009 - 5 DIET MISCONCEPTIONS:

Diet, nutrition and weight loss are probably the most often written and talked about subjects in the entire fitness industry. There seems to a new "plan" and "ground breaking" information all the time. But beware; topics that have so much information are bound to have a number of misconceptions based on half-truths with no scientific study to back them up.

1) Fat makes you fat, so avoid it.
Wrong! fat is needed for absorption of nutrients and to help the proper functioning of many of your body stystems. Unused energy from food(carbohydrates) is what your body stores as fat, "fat is stored energy".

2) You have to radically change your diet.
With all the good basic health information available (i.e., avoid fried foods, go easy on the sugar, etc.) most people need to make only a few changes to achieve their weight loss goals.

3) Avoid any and all sweets until your goals are met.
It's important to put yourself on an eating plan that you can live with. Human nature dictates that depriving yourself of foods you love can lead to bingeing. Give yourself one night a week to break all the rules.

4) Eating fewer meals will help you lose weight.
Although this may seem logical, it's actually counter productive. Your body could go into a starvation mode due to a lack of food and can cause you to gain weight. Eating smaller, well-balanced meals (4-6 times a day) is the healthy solution.

5) If you eat a healthy diet, you'll lose weight.
Close, a healthy diet is essential but controlling the order in which you consume carbohydrates will determine your weight loss. Eat complex, starchy carbs (bread, potatoes, pasta) earlier in the day when you are more active. Ease into simple carbs at night (vegetables, salad) when you won't need or use as much energy.

( Jody Cranston / Article ).

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Release Date: 
Monday, July 27, 2009 - 4:55am
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Jody Cranston, Diet
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Jody Cranston / Powershape.
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Jody
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Cranston
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Canada
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B.C.
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Vancouver