But Wait a Minute, How bands make money?

But Wait a Minute, How bands make money?

Most of these trade show exhibitor providers are great, and appeal well to artists needs. But wait one minute, how does bands make money? Selling album and music tracks on iTunes, Myspace, or Facebook

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Press Release (PressBurner) Sep 24, 2010 - New York, New York - Most online services for Indies musicians and DIY artists are focused on 3 things:

• Load, package, and distribute content to promotional and sales channels
• CD manufacturing, Poster/promotional print, and merchandise edition
• Fans recruitment and management tools

Most of these trade show exhibitor providers are great, and appeal well to artists needs. But wait one minute, how does bands make money? Selling album and music tracks on iTunes, Myspace, or Facebook?

NO! Definitely most of a bands revenue comes from playing gigs, lives and touring thanks to new fans’ impulse purchasing of music and merchandise during live events.

Bands never sell enough Cd to dig out the hole.
Making records is often net lost.
Bands don’t make money from labels.
Bands don’t make money when you purchase their music from store, iTunes, Myspace, or Facebook. By the time everyone has gotten their piece of the pie there’s little left for the band.

You know what, even the bigger signed artists don’t make that much from record sales.
The most consistent form of making money, for Indies and DIY bands, is the shows.
Record sales at gigs can increase the bands’ income by up to 70% depending on the venue. And, Merchandise is definitely another way to bring in some cash for a band.
Some bands live only on merchs sales after gigs and show.

Now come the most interesting question, how do you attract enough people to your DIY gigs and shows to live from your music?

You still can do lot of gigs and shows, but if only few people show up, you still won’t make it, and your reputation and brand will certainly plunge and you can seriously go broke.

Good Music is not enough. Playing a lot of gigs and show is not enough.
You need a minimum number of fans and new fans to make the ends meet.
Here how Adam Schatz of “Zombie Jazz” put after a 1 month summer tour in 2010:

“They loved the music and bought the records and yelled when they wanted to and it was just this incredible feeling. And I thought, “What if it could always be like this? But instead of 30, it’s 100 people?” It’s not too much to ask, and I think it’s highly possible. If we had 100 people at every show we would have made plenty of money. But there’s not an easy way …”

Most events fail not because of planning or execution, but because of the marketing of the event itself. Now, simple event listings and mailing to your personal list is never enough. MySpace is nearly useless and there is too much clutter to fight through on other social networks.

Emailing only your friends and other contacts will convert at the best 2 to 5 percent, and will not be able to help you attract more people. Advertising is expensive and uncertain.

The truth is that event promotion is not picnic. It’s really difficult, stressful and costly to promote events. But now, with GoodBuzz.org we are trying to help.

GoodBuzz.org is an experiment in a new kind of event promotion, built on the idea that event marketing is not only about money. Some of the most successful events we've been involved with engaged in simple grass roots marketing. They only used event posters and word of mouth. Those events did tremendously well on a marketing budget of a few hundred dollars.

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Contact: Mr. Mawuna Koutonin
Phone: 
+33628067920
City: 
New York
State: 
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About Goodbuzz
Phone: 
+33628067920
City: 
New York
State: 
New York
Country: 
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Email: 
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Free Referral Network, Event Promotion, Event Marketing, Peer Referral Network